Gloucester, Ontario

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Flag of Gloucester
Gloucester Ontario locator map.png

Gloucester is a suburb of and within the City of Ottawa. Gloucester Township was established in 1792 and originally included lands east of the Rideau River from the Ottawa River south to Manotick. It was incorporated as a township in 1850 and became a city in 1981. Gloucester was one of the 11 municipalities that merged in 2001 to form the new city of Ottawa. As of the Canada 2016 Census, the former city of Gloucester had a population of 133,280.

Gloucester took its name from Prince William Frederick, Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh.[1]

Contents

  • 1 Demographics
  • 2 Reeves
  • 3 Mayors
  • 4 Gloucester communities and neighbourhoods
  • 5 Education
  • 6 References

Demographics[edit]

Before amalgamating in 2001, Gloucester had a population of 110,264.

According to the Canada 2001 Census:

  • Population: 110,264
  • % Change (1996–2001): 6.0
  • Dwellings: 38,542
  • Area (km².): 293.86
  • Density (persons per km².): 375.2

By the 2006 census, Gloucester's population had increased slightly, to 114,604.

Reeves[edit]

  • 1850 James Sieveright
  • 1851 John McKinnon
  • 1852 Charles Billings
  • 1852-1858 Peter Tompkins
  • 1859-1862 Donald M. Grant
  • 1863 James Brown
  • 1864 Robert Blackburn
  • 1865 James Sieveright
  • 1866 John W. McGuire
  • 1867 Peter Tompkins
  • 1868-1872 Robert Cummings
  • 1873 Henry Robillard
  • 1874-1876 Robert Cummings
  • 1877-1879 William H. Hurdman
  • 1880 Robert Cummings
  • 1881-1883 Alexander Robillard
  • 1884-1887 Robert Cummings
  • 1888-1891 James E. Spratt
  • 1892-1894 Robert Hopkins
  • 1895-1896 P. Cassidy
  • 1897 W. Lennox
  • 1898-1900 F. Caldwell
  • 1901 O. Rocque
  • 1902 F. Caldwell
  • 1903-1912 R. Spratt
  • 1913-1917 C. Hardy
  • 1918-1926 R. Preston
  • 1927-1930 T.A. Spratt
  • 1930 R. Spratt
  • 1931-1939 John Innes
  • 1939 W.J. Perrault
  • 1939 R. Preston
  • 1940-1943 W.J. Perrault
  • 1944-1945 John D. Boyce
  • 1946-1947 J.B. Potvin
  • 1948-1949 Alex Roger
  • 1950-1951 A.E. Davidson
  • 1952-1972 Earl R. Armstrong
  • 1972-1978 Bob MacQuarrie
  • 1978-1980 Elizabeth Stewart

Mayors[edit]

  • 1981-1982 Elizabeth Stewart
  • 1982-1984 Fred G. Barrett
  • 1984-1985 Mitch Owens
  • 1985-1991 Harry Allen
  • 1991-2001 Claudette Cain

Gloucester communities and neighbourhoods[edit]

Prior to amalgamation, the following communities and neighbourhoods were within the city boundaries:

  • Beacon Hill
    • Beacon Hill North
    • Beacon Hill South
    • Beaconwood
  • Blackburn Hamlet
  • Blossom Park
    • Emerald Woods
    • Sawmill Creek
    • Timbermill
    • Upper Hunt Club
  • Cardinal Heights
  • Carlsbad Springs
  • Carson Grove
  • Cedardale
  • Chapel Hill, Ottawa
  • Cyrville
  • Edwards
  • Elizabeth Park
  • Ficko
  • Gloucester Glen
  • Honey Gables
  • Johnston Corners
  • Kempark
  • Leitrim
  • Limebank
  • Notre-Dame-des-Champs
  • Ogilvie Walk
  • Orléans
    • Chapel Hill
    • Chapel Hill South
    • Chateau Neuf
    • Convent Glen North
    • Convent Glen South
    • Hiawatha Park
    • Orléans Village
    • Queenswood Village
    • Sunridge
  • Pineview
  • Piperville
  • Ramseyville
  • Riverside South
  • Rothwell Heights
  • South Gloucester
  • Windsor Park Village
Neighbourhood Population (2016) Population (2011) Population (2006) Area (km2.) Density (per km2.) Census Tracts
Beacon Hill North 9,177 9,007 8,819 5.434 1688.811 5050120.03, 5050120.02
Beacon Hill South 7,319 7,312 6,953 2.258 3241.364 5050121.01, 5050121.02
Blackburn Hamlet 8,167 8,237 8,527 2.413 3384.584 5050125.01, 5050125.02
Blossom Park 14,190 14,060 12,361 6.193 2291.297 5050123.01, 5050123.02
Chapel Hill 8,293 8,521 8,566 3.398 2440.553 5050125.07, 5050125.04
Chapel Hill South 10,308 7,396 5,559 9.901 1041.149 5050125.06
Chateau Neuf 8,407 8,579 8,724 2.051 4098.976 5050125.08, 5050125.09
Convent Glen 6,456 6,572 6,568 4.006 1611.583 5050124.04, 5050124.01
Cyrville-Carson Grove 8,532 8,662 8,173 3.353 2544.587 5050122.01, 5050122.03
Elizabeth Park-Kemp Park 3,410 3,902 3,548 19.687 173.208 5050127.00
Hiawatha Park 4,841 4,821 5,138 4.418 1095.869 5050124.03
Leitrim-Findlay Creek 8,865 4,486 1,333 17.346 511.057 5050126.03
Orleans Village 5,229 5,195 5,497 1.984 2635.186 5050125.05
Orleans Wood 3,976 3,851 3,892 1.564 2541.549 5050124.02
Pine View 6,463 6,505 6,622 3.698 1747.512 5050122.02
Riverside South 12,342 10,908 6,844 14.136 873.090 5050126.05, 5050126.06
Rothwell Heights 1,664 1,686 1,673 1.593 1044.504 5050120.01
Rural Gloucester 5,641 3,978 4,732 195.066 28.918 5050126.04, 5050125.03

Coordinates: 45°26′7″N 75°36′33″W / 45.43528°N 75.60917°W / 45.43528; -75.60917

Education[edit]

Anglophone secular public schools are operated by the Ottawa-Carleton District School Board. Anglophone Catholic public schools are operated by the Ottawa Catholic School Board. French secular public schools are operated by the Conseil des écoles publiques de l'Est de l'Ontario (CÉPEO). The Conseil des écoles catholiques du Centre-Est (CECCE), formerly known as the Conseil des écoles catholiques de langue française du Centre-Est (CECLFCE), operates the French Catholic public schools.

The CECCE has its headquarters in Gloucester.[2] The predecessor school district, the Conseil Des Écoles Catholiques de Langue Française de la Région D'Ottawa-Carleton (CECLF), had its headquarters in the current CECCE headquarters.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Courageous settlers first located in Carleton back in 1818". Ottawa Citizen. Apr 28, 1953. pp. A20. Retrieved 2 December 2015. 
  2. ^ "Contact US." Conseil des écoles catholiques du Centre-Est. Retrieved on September 10, 2012. "Conseil des écoles catholiques du Centre-Est 4000 Labelle St. Ottawa (Ontario) K1J 1A1 Canada"
  3. ^ "School Boards in Ontario Les conseils scolaires de l'Ontario." Province of Ontario. January 1996. Retrieved on September 10, 2012. "4000, rue Labelle, Gloucester (Ontario) K1J 1A1"
Bibliography
  • Serré, Robert (2004), Pioneer families of the Gloucester Quarries in Eastern Ontario., Ottawa, Ontario: Gloucester Historical Society